Guide to Flooring Costs & Estimates

The right flooring can last your home a lifetime, but finding the right floor for your home and budget can be a challenge. There are many things to consider before you buy, from looks to function, but the cost is often the ultimate deciding factor on which flooring your home has.

The average cost range to install flooring is between $1,963 and $5,806, with an average price of $3,836 as reported by homeowners. The final price will depend on the type of flooring you choose and the square footage to be covered.

 

How Much Does Flooring Cost

How much you will pay for flooring depends on several factors. Below is a high level breakdown of the costs for common flooring types when used in living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms for a total average home of around 550 square feet.


Installation Cost Considerations

The amount of money you will pay for installation depends on a variety of factors, including where you live and the intricacy of your project. Tasks such as furniture removal and replacement, repairing the subfloor and removing and disposing of the old floor will be additional charges on top. Be sure to ask your floor installer if these charges have already been accounted for in your quote. If not, you could end up paying for additional services you thought were included. To avoid unnecessary or hidden costs, be sure to always get multiple quotes from companies. You can use HomeStars Get A Quote feature to get multiple quotes from top-rated companies in your area for free.

 

Types Of Flooring and Their Costs

Wood Flooring

There are two primary types of wood flooring homeowners can choose from. The first is solid wood floor — these floors are generally ¾” thick and can be purchased either raw or pre-finished. This is the most expensive type of hardwood floor.

The second type is engineered wood floor. The difference is that engineered wood floors have a top wear layer, usually ⅛” thick of hardwood with more layers of plywood underneath. Engineered floors are gaining popularity due to their price point, however they do not have the same longevity that solid wood floors do.

 

Cost Factors

Typical factors that can increase or decrease your cost include:

  • The type of wood you use — solid or engineered, solid hardwood generally costs more than engineered hardwood
  • Distance to the job site (the more remotely you live, the higher the cost will be)
  • Any work that has to be done around existing framing, HVAC systems, electrical, plumbing, or other such systems. Floor registers are a good example of such things
  • Testing and remediation of hazardous materials. Older homes may have lead and/or asbestos
  • If a general contractor will be supervising the job, add about 15% to 23%
  • Sales tax on materials
  • Permits or inspection fees if applicable

Laminate Flooring

One of the great things about laminate flooring is that it is almost always less expensive than the material it imitates. Materials like real wood, stone and tile are not only more expensive to buy they are also more expensive to install. This is why laminate is a great alternative when you want the look of the real thing but cannot afford the price.

 

Cost Factors

Typical factors that can increase or decrease your cost include:

  • Thickness of the laminate
  • Supplier of the laminate (some high end manufacturers do a great job at imitating more expensive materials)
  • Any work that has to be done around existing framing, HVAC systems, electrical, plumbing, or other such systems. Floor registers are a good example of such things
  • Universal factors such as distance to job, work done around existing framing, testing/remediation, use of a general contractor, sales tax and permits also apply

Vinyl and Linoleum Flooring

If your budget is tight, vinyl and linoleum are an excellent option to help save on both material and labour costs. Similar to laminate, they both can look like wood, stone or tile but at a fraction of the cost.

 

Cost Factors

Typical factors that can increase or decrease your cost include:

  • For vinyl, if the surface you are applying it to is not smooth, an underlayment of plywood may be needed. It needs to be smooth so it will adhere
  • Linoleum’s extra cost will be in the form of a sealer. Linoleum needs to be sealed after installation and then once a year after that to maintain its luster
  • Universal factors such as distance to job, work done around existing framing, testing/remediation, use of a general contractor, sales tax and permits also apply

Carpeting

While not quite as inexpensive as linoleum, carpeting is a great option for any budget. When it comes to costs, you will need to consider room size, pile of carpet, labour and installation fees.

 

Cost Factors

The biggest cost factor for installing carpet, besides the carpet itself, is the area to be covered. There are also more materials that need to be purchased than just the carpet. For example, tack strips around the perimeter of the room are needed to help hold the carpet in place. Carpet padding beneath the carpet is not a necessity, but it will make your carpet a lot more comfortable. Installing your new carpet is fairly involved, especially if it’s a particularly large area to cover.

Other factors that will affect the cost are the standard ones for all flooring projects:

  • Distance to the job site (the more remotely you live, the higher the cost will be)
  • Any work that has to be done around existing framing, HVAC systems, electrical, plumbing, or other such systems. Floor registers are a good example of such things
  • Testing and remediation of hazardous materials. Older homes may have lead and/or asbestos
  • If a general contractor will be supervising the job, add about 15% to 23%
  • Sales tax on materials
  • Permits or inspection fees if applicable

Tile Flooring

There is no shortage on tile options or their price points. Something to keep in mind is that a small per-unit cost can translate into a huge difference by the time the project is done. Installation is fairly involved and can be more expensive than the cost of materials.

 

Cost Factors

The same standard factors are true for tiles as they are on other flooring projects:

  • Distance to the job site (the more remotely you live, the higher the cost will be)
  • Any work that has to be done around existing framing, HVAC systems, electrical, plumbing, or other such systems. Floor registers are a good example of such things
  • Testing and remediation of hazardous materials. Older homes may have lead and/or asbestos
  • If a general contractor will be supervising the job, add about 15% to 23%
  • Sales tax on materials
  • Permits or inspection fees if applicable
 

Kitchen Floor Options and Costs

It is common for the flooring in the kitchen to be different from that of the rest of the house. If you’re planning on adding new floors to your entire home, you should consider what kind of floors will go into the kitchen and how that will affect your overall budget. Here are the most common types of kitchen flooring, some facts and their costs.

 
 
Cork Floor
– Costs: $653-$1,960
– Eco-friendly
– Mildew-resistant
– Stain-resistant
– Requires regular maintenance
Ceramic Flooring
– Costs: $653-$2,614
– Durable
– Wide variety of colors
– Susceptible to cracking and chipping
Bamboo Floors
– Costs: $784-$1,307
– Eco-friendly
– Low-maintenance
– Low-cost
– Scratches easily
Linoleum
– Costs: $1,045-$3,267
– Eco-friendly
– Stain-resistant
– Requires regular maintenance
Vinyl Floor
– Costs: $1,307-$1,960
– Inexpensive
– Durable
– Can emit VOCs
Stone Floor
– Costs: $1,307-$3,921
– Durable
– Expensive
– Absorbs stains
Wood Flooring
– Costs: $1,900-$3,900
– Durable
– Wear-resistant
– Requires regular maintenance
Concrete Flooring
– Costs: $1,900-$5,200
– Easy to maintain
– Long-lasting
– Moisture-resistant
Slate Floor
– Costs: $1,960-$3,900
– Durable
– Stain-resistant
– Low-maintenance
– Less variety in aesthetics
Laminate Flooring
– Costs: $1,900-$5,882
– Eco-friendly
– Inexpensive
– Wide variety of styles
– Requires regular maintenance
Marble Floors
– Costs: $1,960-$5,228
– Durable
– Long-lasting when properly maintained
– Stains and scratches easily
Terrazzo
– Costs: $5,228-$19,600
– Durable
– Long-lasting
– Easy to clean
– Expensive option
 
 

Finding the right flooring for your home can be confusing, especially if you’re not sure of what you’re looking for. Luckily, HomeStars has thousands of flooring experts who can help you with everything from selecting materials, to installation and beyond. If you’re in the need of a flooring expert, be sure to connect with one on HomeStars so you know you’re working with verified and trusted home service pros.


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